Tabular text data processing for merging and transforming flow-cytometric data from FlowJo for importing into SPICE, written in Swift 5 and targeting macOS 10.12+. Version 2 is a vast improvement over the original in terms of user interface and data integrity. The work included a server-side component for usage tracking. The app is code-signed and distributed on NIAID’s website with SPICE.

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Simplified Presentation of Incredibly Complex Evaluations. Data mining and visualization bioinformatics application for multicolor flow-cytometric data, written in Objective-C and targeting Mac OS X 10.9+. It is used primarily by the NIH/NIAID Vaccine Research Center to analyze blood and tissue samples for the identification of effective vaccines. The work included server-side components for user registration and usage tracking. The app is code-signed and distributed on NIAID’s website.

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Mastering Xcode 4 Book Cover

Mastering Xcode 4: Develop and Design, is an intermediate-level book about version 4 of Apple’s IDE, published in late 2011 by Peachpit Press (a Pearson company). It is the first edition (a second edition bears my name as second author). It was well-received and maintains a 4/5 star review on Amazon.

Released under Bartas Technologies. A manual transcription application for an era of expensive and unreliable speech transcription technology, written in Objective-C and (in version 2) targeting Mac OS X 10.4+. It allows users to perform manual (listen-and-type) transcription, person-to-blurb attribution for multi-speaker transcripts, as well as the use of programmable keyboard shortcuts and USB foot pedal integration for transport control. It has earned numerous positive reviews and several high-profile features in well-known publications. The app has also remained a top seller (despite its obvious age) to its retirement in early 2020.

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Released under Bartas Technologies. A tabular data file editing tool written in Objective-C and targeting Mac OS X 10.6+. It gives users the ability to import, edit, filter, merge, and otherwise transform tabular data (comma-, tab-, pipe-, etc.-delimited text). Born out of frustration with other Mac apps’ mangling of tabular text, this niche tool was still in heavy use up to its retirement in early 2020.

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Released under Bartas Technologies. One of the first “writing project managers” for Mac OS X, written in Objective-C and targeting (in version 2) Mac OS X 10.3+. It eschewed the complexities of word processors in favor of organization and data integrity and took the Mac writing community by storm. It has received many positive high-profile reviews in its day, as well as many mentions in book credits and dedications. It still had active users (of older Macs) up to its retirement in early 2019 (18 years of die-hard fans, despite its obvious age). Version 2 enjoyed nearly two decades of stable operation with updates necessary only to adapt to changes in the underlying OS.

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Released under Bartas Technologies. A visual historic timeline creator for illustration, written in Objective-C and targeting Mac OS X 10.4+. It allowed users to “draw” events (as points in time or spans of time) within the chosen range, expressible in any unit of time, as well as relative “sequential” units. It had many visual formatting features and automatically-sized itself to accommodate overlapping spans. It was for several years the first and only such application to offer direct manipulation of the timeline canvas (vs. manipulating a list of events with the drawn timeline as a passive view). Temporis was retired in 2014 with no new version.

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Released under Bartas Technologies. A Spotlight plugin written in Objective-C, targeting Mac OS X 10.4+. It added the ability to search the manifest contents of zip files (file and folder names, user comments), but would not index contents of files in the archive due to the complexities of Spotlight’s indexing approach as well as available disk space and performance. Ziplight quickly rose to the top of Apple’s Spotlight Plugin download page and remained there until the demise of their Downloads pages. There, it earned multiple Apple Staff Pick awards until it was “Sherlocked” by the inclusion of similar functionality in Mac OS X 10.6, when it was retired. Amusingly, more developers and future coworkers recognized Ziplight (because they were pleased users) than its author’s name or other works.

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